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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

FT columnist Lucy Kellaway moves on after years of deriding corporate bullshit

July 2017: Financial Times (FT) columnist Lucy Kellaway has been writing on the strange and indecipherable language of chief executives and their companies for over 20 years. She looks back at a career of deriding the hot air and asks: has it made any difference?

 

FT columnist Lucy Kellaway says chief executives need to have a hard think before deciding to join Twitter. She looks at the successes and failures of CEO tweeters including Tim Cook, Marissa Mayer, Elon Musk and Warren Buffett.

 

After 31 years at the Financial Times, management columnist and associate editor Lucy Kellaway is leaving to start a new career as a teacher. In an FT Facebook Live discussion with Gideon Rachman, she explains her move.

 

I’m becoming a teacher at 58 — this is why you should too | Lucy Kellaway | TEDx London Business School — After 31 years as a prominent and well-respected Financial Times columnist, Lucy Kellaway has made the decision to leave – to be a maths teacher. There are many programmes encouraging fresh graduates to enter the teaching profession, but what about seasoned professionals? In her talk, Lucy will reframe the way we think about being an educator and why it’s more important than ever to be one now.

Lucy Kellaway has spent the last three decades at the Financial Times writing columns that poke fun at corporate life, business jargon and management fads. She is the newspaper’s office agony aunt and inventor of the insufferable fictional character, Martin Lukes. In September 2017 she is leaving all this to be a maths teacher in an inner city school in London. In November 2016 she co-founded Now Teach, a charity designed to persuade high-flying fifty somethings from the corporate world to train alongside her. For nine years she was a non-executive director of Admiral plc.

 

FT columnist Lucy Kellaway explains how not to compose your summary on the networking site LinkedIn. She looks at the profiles of Hillary Clinton, former GE head Jack Welch and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman:

 

The last time Lucy Kellaway visited Unilever’s London HQ it was a rabbit warren of corridors, closed offices and wood panelling. Now it’s a vast glass and steel temple to the modern office — but is it any better?

 

Lucy Kellaway, FT management columnist, and Tyler Brûlé, editor-in-chief of Monocle and the FT’s Fast Lane columnist, go head to head over how we work today, and what the rules of office life should be.

 

Kellaway and Tang on rules for life | FT Life

 

Monday, July 10, 2017

Swiss basket of grocery items +91% more expensive than France in 2017

A Swiss basket of grocery items is +91% more expensive than France in 2017.

Switzerland is a wealthy country and the per head standard of living (based on consumption adjusted for price differences) is among Europe's highest. However, the rise in the value of the Swiss franc in recent years compared with the euro has made the country a very expensive place to visit and it is also bad news for low-income residents.

A snapshot comparison by Swissinfo of a 14-item list of basic groceries has revealed a +€27.74 (CHF30.38) difference between Switzerland (COOP supermarket in Lausanne) and France (Carrefour supermarket in Ferney Voltaire, near Geneva).